All articles in Sleep Basics

Too Much Technology Affects Quality of Sleep

A study titled “Association between Information and Communication Technology Usage and the Quality of Sleep among School-Aged Children during a School Week” from the School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland, sought to determine the association between communication technology (ICT) usage and quality of sleep in school-aged children during a school week.

Researchers concluded that intensity of information and communication technology does seems to interfere with the quality of sleep, with low-use participants sleeping better than the high users.

According to the new research, all 61 subjects, 10–14 years of age, were monitored using a portable device (Holter monitor) to measure heart rate variability (HRV) over a 24-hour period, while an activity diary was used to record in 15-minute intervals.

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High amount of ICT use by children and adolescents may destroy good sleep pattern,” concluded researchers. “In particular the sympathetic overdrive may continue to the early sleep and cause a delay in parasympathetic recovery.

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Electronics Stealing Sleep From Many US Kids, Poll Shows

Megan Brooks

March 04, 2014

American children are not getting enough sleep, and all the laptops, smartphones, and televisions in their rooms may be a big part of the problem, according to the latest annual Sleep in America Poll conducted by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF).

The task force behind the poll says parents can make a difference by setting boundaries around electronics use, enforcing rules, and setting a good example.

“For children, a good night’s sleep is essential to health, development and performance in school,” task force member Kristen L. Knutson, PhD, from the University of Chicago in Illinois, said in an NSF news release. “We found that when parents take action to protect their children’s sleep, their children sleep better.”

The 2014 Sleep in America poll was an online survey of 1103 American parents of children aged 6 to 17 years. It was conducted from December 12 through December 23, 2013.

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Disruptions: For a Restful Night, Make Your Smartphone Sleep on the Couch

By NICK BILTON
To avoid constantly checking email and Twitter in the middle of the night, a traditional alarm clock may be a better choice for the bedroom than a smartphone.
Nick Bilton/The New York Times
To avoid constantly checking email and Twitter in the middle of the night, a traditional alarm clock may be a better choice for the bedroom than a smartphone.

We’ve all been there. You wake up in the middle of the night and grab your smartphone to check the time — it’s 3 a.m. — and see an alert. Before you know it, you fall down a rabbit hole of email andTwitter. Sleep? Forget it.

Well, I’ve found a $7 solution: an old-fashioned alarm clock. My smartphone has been banished from the bedroom.

Sure, you can flip your phone to quiet mode. But the draw to roam in the early hours is powerful. Sleep researchers say this isn’t good for you. You might as well get up and drink a shot of espresso.

“It’s a very slippery slope, once you’ve picked up your phone, to see what time it is, to checking your email, to lying awake with anxiety,” said Dr.

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7 Reasons Why You Have Trouble Sleeping

Originally posted in:

2013-02-21-grandparentslogo.jpg  |  By  Posted: 01/11/2014 8:12 am EST  |  Updated: 01/12/2014 9:05 am EST

 
having trouble sleeping

SPECIAL FROM Grandparents.com

If you’ve ever counted sheep, woken up multiple times during the night or experience daytime sleepiness, you are one of the 67 percent of older adults who suffer from insomnia symptoms at least a few nights a week, according to the National Sleep Foundation. As we age, sleeplessness may become more of an issue, so we’ve rounded up the top causes of insomnia for older adults.

  • Cause #1: Circadian Rhythm
    Aging causes our circadian rhythms to change and become less consistent, which makes us more susceptible to insomnia, according to the National Institutes of Health. We become sleepy earlier in the evening and wake up earlier in the morning. When we try to fight our body’s natural instincts by attempting to stay awake or sleep later, it often becomes a losing battle.
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Sleep tips: When counting sheep just isn’t cutting it

Many Americans struggle to get enough sleep. Despite their attempts to do it all, pressure to meet the demands of an active, on-the-go lifestyle may be holding adults back from achieving the type of uninterrupted slumber that leaves them feeling rejuvenated in the morning.

These issues are common, as the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research estimates that nearly 70 million Americans suffer from sleep problems.

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. recently conducted an informal sleep survey that compiled data from 1,000 people across the U.S. who chose to participate in the online survey about how much and how well they sleep.

According to the findings, 71 percent of survey participants said they don’t get the doctor recommended seven to eight hours of sleep each night.

Furthermore, 55 percent of those surveyed indicated that stress prevents them from falling asleep.

Following these simple steps and winding down after a hectic day remain more important to sleep than many may think.

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Back to School Is a Great Time for Teens to Sleep

Originally Posted: 09/03/2013 6:59 pm in Huffington Post Healthy Living

By Rafael Pelayo, M.D.

As teenagers return to school, the nightmarish reality of increased homework along with more social demands may make getting a full night sleep just a dream. They may feel trapped for time and feel forced to sacrifice their sleep. Teens may model themselves on their sleep-deprived parents and peers and think they are supposed to get less sleep as they mature. Yet science confirms that making healthy sleep a priority will help teens and their families in many ways. Alternatively, sleep deprivation is associated with serious problems including irritability, learning difficulty, motor vehicle accidents, and increased risk of suicide.

For a maturing teenager, developing an autonomous lifestyle is a matter of choices. When they make a decision, they must weigh what is in it for them. Making sleep a priority is a lifestyle choice that quickly pays off.

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Normal sleep

By Jerrold Kram, MD, FCCP

Medical Director, California Center For Sleep Disorders

Centuries ago there was a belief that going to sleep was like dying and waking up was coming back to life.  It was not until the 1800′s that scientists began to realize that in fact there was brain activity during sleep and not until the 1950′s the fact that there were different stages of sleep during the night was discovered.

We now understand that in fact humans experience 3 different states of existence, wakefulness, Non-REM sleep and REM sleep. Non-REM sleep has 3 different stages and occurs for about 75% of the night, the remainder REM or Rapid Eye Movement sleep is the state where most dreaming takes place. Yet despite our ability to measure these stages of sleep we actually do not know why we need to sleep and the exact purpose of each stage of sleep. We all know we can’t function without sleep but what exactly takes place during that 1/3 or our lives remains unknown.

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Advocacy

The Talk About Sleep advocacy mission is to increase sleep disorder awareness in both the public and medical professional communities. This will be achieved by coordinating efforts to “get the word” out through mass media vehicles. Advocacy Services is a highly focused group whose goal is to create global awareness of sleep disorders as a life issue. In general, the Talk About Sleep Advocate is a friend of sleep who disseminates information, motivates groups and influences individuals regarding a wide variety of sleep related issues with the goal of forwarding sleep awareness.

What Is Sleep Advocacy?

National Sleep Foundation/Centers for Disease Control Funding Request

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What is Sleep Advocacy?

Forty million Americans suffer with debilitating sleep disorders, and surveys show that an additional sixty million people experience sleep difficulties more than once per week. The cost to society is lost productivity, wasted medical resources, and a greatly reduced quality of life.

Even more distressing is the fragmented healthcare market which has had great difficulty in channeling resources back into the medical system to help identify and facilitate the management of the primary sleep problem. The paradigm needs to change. Sleep is not a cost center, but an unrecognized medical illness that, in the case of sleep apnea, will result in twice the consumption of medical resources when compared to a similar person without the sleep disorder.

The statistics are graphic. One hundred deaths per night are contributed to by sleep apnea alone. Three out of four people with Narcolepsy remain undiagnosed. The cost of sleep related traffic accidents exceed $64 billion per year.

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View a Sleep Study

From the Stanford University Sleep Disorders Clinic

Talk About Sleep, in conjunction with the Stanford University Sleep Disorders Clinic, is pleased to bring you a photo essay and personal tour to demystify the Sleep Study that your doctor has prescribed for you. To see a detailed view of any of the photos shown below, simply click on the photo.

The Polysomnogram (PSG)

A Sleep Study or Polysomnogram (PSG) is a multiple-component test, which electronically transmits and records specific physical activities while you sleep. The recordings become data, which will be “read” or analyzed by a qualified physician to determine whether or not you have a sleep disorder.

Throughout the tour, we will discuss the many components of a PSG and explain the 4 types of Polysomnographic Studies. They are:

  • Diagnostic Overnight PSG - General monitoring and evaluation.
  • Diagnostic Daytime Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) - Used to diagnose Narcolepsy and measure the degree of daytime sleepiness.
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