All articles in Sleep Disorders in Women

Why women sleep worse than men

Originally posted by SHELLEY WHITE, Special to The Globe and Mail

This is the third of a nine-part print and online series looking at the science of sleep and the vital role of sleep in maintaining overall health.

Like millions of Canadian mothers, Dawn Trudeau’s sleep troubles began when her daughter was born.

“You’re getting up at all hours for feedings and whatnot, and I had a hard time getting her to sleep through the night,” says the Ottawa-based, 46-year-old social media marketer and blogger at “My husband is great, and he would help in a minute but he just did not hear the baby crying,” she says.

Even after her daughter started sleeping through the night consistently at age 4, Ms. Trudeau says her sleeping problems persisted to the point of insomnia. “I kind of got used to it at that point.” And now that her daughter is 7, her sleep disturbances are also business-related.

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Fibromyalgia – Does Melatonin Help?

Originally posted in National Pain Report on August 24, 2015

Talk to a person who suffers from fibromyalgia and it doesn’t take long for the topic of sleep to come up.

“I’ve had major issues with sleeping,” said Jenny Schwarz who is from East Helena, Montana. “I have heard that a full night’s rest would greatly reduce my pain, but I don’t remember the last time I slept through the night.”

Is melatonin a possible answer?

Natural levels of melatonin in the blood are highest at night. According to the Mayo Clinic, Some research suggests that melatonin supplements taken at the right time might be helpful in treating jet lag or other sleep disorders that involve poor alignment of your natural biological clock with the night-day pattern around you. Melatonin might also reduce the time it takes to fall asleep — although this effect is typically mild

Now there’s world that several studies have shown that melatonin supplements can reduce pain in patients who have fibromyalgia.

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Sound waves can improve sleep and memory, study says



Sound wave therapy can improve sleep and memory, according to a new study fromNorthwestern Medicine in the US.

According to Psych Central, Neuroscience graduate student Nelly Papalambros wanted to find out if there was a non-invasive way to improve sleep quality, because of its many effects on health. Poor sleep has been linked to everything from cognitive problems (including memory issues and difficulty concentrating) to heart attack and disease, while insomnia drastically increases the risk of accident and injury.

Papalambros recruited study participants with an increased risk of heart disease, and measured their baseline stats and sleep patterns while they stayed at a sleep research centre overnight. She then tested whether playing a low-grade static noise could improve their quality of sleep. This sound was developed by Giovanni Santostasi and is personalised in order to be more effective.

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 3 Healthy Sleeping Habits Every Woman Should Adopt

By Michelle King Robson Expert HERWriter

Sleep Disorders  related image

Elena Elisseeva/PhotoSpin

How do you feel at 8:00 each day, in the morning and in the evening? These used to be really unpleasant times for me. I would be groggy when the sun rose and sluggish when the sun went down. And I would struggle to relax—contending with hot flashes, joint pain and restlessness during the twilight hours in between.

I am an ambitious person. Like most of you, I am juggling work, volunteering and spending time with loved ones. And I always strive to make a positive impact through what I do. But I also know that if I don’t take care of myself, then I can’t be a source of support to others.

That’s why I came up with these healthy nighttime habits to help make sure I wake up empowered for the day. I think you deserve these too!


1. Maintain an evening routine to unwind and disconnect

When bedtime rolls around, my mind is usually still active with ideas and thinking of my long to-do list.

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Around the Clock: Sleep disorders can have wide-ranging consequences


June 18, 2014 1:30 pm  •  

Ulcers, hyperglycemia, diabetes, hypertension, gastric intestinal problems are not always caused by diet – they could be linked to a disrupted internal clock.

Working a job that requires shift-work or experiencing chronic jet lag disrupts your circadian rhythm. It results in countless consequences to your body that simply can’t be fixed by counting sheep.

“Stimulants such as caffeine can disrupt a patient’s circadian rhythm but also irregular sleep habits, jet lag, Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder, which is common in teenagers, Shift Work Sleep Disorder and Advanced Sleep Phase Disorder, which is common in older people,” says Dr. Baqhar Mohideen, the medical director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Porter Regional Hospital.

“A quarter of American workers are on shift-work – 10 percent of which experience Shift Work Sleep Disorders.”

Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder is when patients fall asleep late and have difficulty waking up in the morning.

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4 Simple Ways to Sleep Better Every Night

You can start by putting your smart phone away

Difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep also spells trouble for your waking hours.

At night you lie in bed, watching the clock and stressing out that you will have to get up in a few hours. During the day, you’re exhausted, sleepy and unfocused.

You’re not alone. At least 40 million Americans suffer each year from sleep disorders such as apnea, narcolepsy or restless leg syndrome, says the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Another 20 million experience occasional sleeping problems.

The amount of sleep each person needs depends on many factors, including age. For most adults, the best amount of sleep is seven to eight hours a night, the NIH says. Some people, though, may need as few as five hours or as many as 10 hours of sleep, the NIH says.

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Insomnia ‘Extremely’ Common in Female US Veterans

June 12, 2014


MINNEAPOLIS — The prevalence of insomnia is “extremely” high in female veterans in the United States, according to a new national survey that confirms and extends a prior study from a single Veterans Affairs (VA) center.

“Studies are needed to identify best practice models of care for this considerable segment of the women veteran population with insomnia disorders,” the authors say.

Jennifer L. Martin, PhD, from the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System and the David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, presented the findings here at SLEEP 2014, the 28th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

In an earlier study, she and her colleagues found rates of insomnia greater than 40% among female veterans who receive VA healthcare in 1 healthcare system. Their current study builds on this finding by looking at a nationwide sample of female veterans.

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Half of pregnant women who have hypertension and snore unknowingly have a sleep disorder

Half of pregnant women who have hypertension and snore unknowingly have a sleep disorder
Louise O’Brien, Ph.D., M.S. is an associate professor at U-M’s Sleep Disorders Center in the Department of Neurology and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the U-M Medical School. Credit: University of Michigan Health System
One in two hypertensive pregnant women who habitually snore may have unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea, a sleeping disorder that can reduce blood oxygen levels during the night and that has been linked to serious health conditions, new University of Michigan-led research shows.

One in four hypertensive  who don’t snore also unknowingly suffer from the, according to the study that appears in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“We know that habitual snoring is linked with poor pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child, including increased risk of C-sections and smaller babies,” says lead author Louise O’Brien, Ph.D., M.S., associate professor at U-M’s Sleep Disorders Center in the Department of Neurology and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the U-M Medical School.

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7 Reasons Why You Have Trouble Sleeping

Originally posted in:

2013-02-21-grandparentslogo.jpg  |  By  Posted: 01/11/2014 8:12 am EST  |  Updated: 01/12/2014 9:05 am EST

having trouble sleeping


If you’ve ever counted sheep, woken up multiple times during the night or experience daytime sleepiness, you are one of the 67 percent of older adults who suffer from insomnia symptoms at least a few nights a week, according to the National Sleep Foundation. As we age, sleeplessness may become more of an issue, so we’ve rounded up the top causes of insomnia for older adults.

  • Cause #1: Circadian Rhythm
    Aging causes our circadian rhythms to change and become less consistent, which makes us more susceptible to insomnia, according to the National Institutes of Health. We become sleepy earlier in the evening and wake up earlier in the morning. When we try to fight our body’s natural instincts by attempting to stay awake or sleep later, it often becomes a losing battle.
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