All articles in Snoring

Why snoring gets worse as you age

  • By Melissa Erickson

    Originally Posted in Lenconnect on Jul. 24, 2015 at 11:37 AM

    Whether you’re wheezing, snorting or snuffling while sawing logs, your snoring is not only upsetting to your family, it could be a sign of ill health.

    And it’s probably getting worse with age.

    There are reasons why a person’s snoring becomes more disruptive as the birthdays roll by, said Dr. Ilene Rosen, a member of the board of directors for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine who is board certified in sleep, internal and pulmonary medicine.

    Cause for concern?

    About 40 percent of adult men and 24 percent of adult women are habitual snorers, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. While snoring may be a nuisance to your family, it can also point to underlying medical issues, said Rosen, who is the program director for the University of Pennsylvania Sleep Fellowship and an associate professor of clinical medicine for the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

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How To Get Better Sleep With A Snorer

About a quarter of people who are married or live with someone say that they’ve lost sleep because of their bed partner, according to a 2005 National Sleep Foundation survey.

And one of the biggest culprits — unsurprisingly — is snoring.

“Today” show viewers sent in video snapshots of what keeps them up at night. And while the results, seen in the clip above, are easy to laugh off, snoring can actually be serious.

Snoring “can be a sign of something more serious, called sleep apnea,” said Eric Cohen, M.D., an obstruction of the airways that can cause a snorer to stop breathing, sometimes hundreds of times a night.

“Your body has to work harder, your heart has to work harder,” Cohen said about sleep apnea, which can lead to health concerns like increased risk of depression, diabetes and heart attack.

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How snoring can ruin your day

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Picture: Thobeka Zazi Ndabula

QUESTION: I need urgent help. For the past three months I have been constantly exhausted. Most mornings I wake up with great difficulty. I also feel really groggy.

My partner is constantly on my case about me waking her up with my snoring.

She says I stop breathing when I sleep. I feel she is paranoid, but am concerned about my deteriorating function. I feel like a zombie for most of the day now.

ANSWER: The situation sounds very unpleasant. I’m sure it is placing major stress on your relationship. Disturbed sleep is a terrible thing and I do understand your partner’s frustration.

Snoring is often overlooked as a contributor to poor sleep and related health problems. People underestimate the long-term effects, besides losing a relationship partner or the passion in your bedroom.

Another misconception is that only obese people snore. Obesity is often a causative factor, but not always the only culprit.

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Snoring masks don’t kill sex life: Study

A common therapy to tackle obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) does not become a hindrance between the sheets, says a study, allaying fears of OSA patients who believe the therapy interferes with sex.

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is somewhat common in patients with OSA who are often recommended to use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask to get rid of the ED symptoms.

The machine uses a constant flow of positive air pressure to ensure the wearer gets adequate oxygen.

“However, some patients may feel that the PAP interferes with foreplay and sex,” the study said.

For their research, the team from Rosalind Franklin University in Chicago analysed 52 participants who were screened about their sex life, compliance of PAP use, body mass index (BMI), presence of ED and use of drugs like Viagra.

Results showed that when adjusting for all confounding variables, CPAP compliance does not predict sexual quality of life.

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Theravent and Talk About Sleep Partnership Expands the Discussion on Snoring

I am really excited to share with you that Theravent and Talk About Sleep are partnering to help build and expand the conversation around snoring including its causes, effects, and remedies. We are collaborating to expand and educate this robust community, while giving the average snorer more representation and resources online.

To facilitate educating and connecting those in the snoring community, Theravent will lend its expertise to offer snorers solutions as well as promote the importance of recognizing snoring as a sleep disorder. Theravent plans to use its knowledge-base to share the latest innovations and research and feature insights from respected sleep experts. Towards this end, Talk About Sleep has added multiple levels of exciting and insightful content including general information, diagnosis, treatment and disease management. In addition, a snoring forum has been added which I will moderate. I look forward to connecting with you via the forum and I hope you will participate.

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Half of pregnant women who have hypertension and snore unknowingly have a sleep disorder

Half of pregnant women who have hypertension and snore unknowingly have a sleep disorder
Louise O’Brien, Ph.D., M.S. is an associate professor at U-M’s Sleep Disorders Center in the Department of Neurology and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the U-M Medical School. Credit: University of Michigan Health System
One in two hypertensive pregnant women who habitually snore may have unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea, a sleeping disorder that can reduce blood oxygen levels during the night and that has been linked to serious health conditions, new University of Michigan-led research shows.

One in four hypertensive  who don’t snore also unknowingly suffer from the, according to the study that appears in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“We know that habitual snoring is linked with poor pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child, including increased risk of C-sections and smaller babies,” says lead author Louise O’Brien, Ph.D., M.S., associate professor at U-M’s Sleep Disorders Center in the Department of Neurology and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the U-M Medical School.

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The Problem With Snoring

Snoring has long been considered a nuisance to bed partners and an issue of denial for millions of snorers.  Having spent time on both sides of the equation with a family full of snorers and as a snorer myself seeking a solution to provide relief for my wife, I completely understand the challenges for couples and family’s all over. 

In total, sleep related breathing disorders, ranging from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnea, affects up to 90 million people in the US.  This is without counting the countless hours of sleep lost by those sharing the room with the snorer or apnea sufferer.

The numbers are astounding:

–          40 to 50 million snorers in the U.S. alone

–          35 to 50 million disrupted bed partners of snorer’s

The problem of snoring is nothing new; we’ve all seen snorers on sitcom’s and movies for years as its common place for us to normalize snoring as regular and untreatable. 

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