All articles in Sleep Apnea

Understanding the Report of a Sleep Study


Deepak Shrivastava, MD, FAASM, RPSGT

(A Sleep Specialist)

A ‘Sleep Study’, also known as polysomnography or PSG, has been used for decades to diagnose and evaluate the severity of sleep apnea or reversible cessation of breathing during sleep.  Sleep apnea, sometimes called obstructive sleep apnea, is a common health problem that affects millions of men and women. It occurs in children as well. The potential life-threatening effects of sleep apnea include heart and blood pressure problems, anxiety, depression and other mental health problems and difficulty is controlling blood sugar and cholesterol levels.  An increasing number of sleep studies are being conducted as more people are becoming aware of the importance of good quality sleep and doctors are evaluating more people with sleep apnea symptoms. The presenting symptoms could be as subtle as daytime fatigue, tiredness, non-refreshing sleep or more intense like snoring, daytime sleepiness, and bed-partner noticing complete cessation of breathing until an awakening (can occur every few seconds to every couple of minutes).

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Sleep Apnea Linked To Migraine, Panic Disorder, Hearing And Other Things You Need To Know

Originally posted in Tech Times By Rina Marie Doctor, Tech Times | July 27, 9:54 AM


Previous studies suggest that both depressive and anxiety disorders emerge after a diagnosis of sleep apnea had been made. However, the exact association between sleep apnea and panic disorder is not clearly established and so a group of researchers decided to investigate on their relationship. Migraines and hearing impairments are also being linked to sleep apnea in other literatures.

A group of researchers, who studied the association of panic disorder and sleep apnea obtained their data from patients diagnosed with sleep apnea from 2000-2010 through the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The researchers found that out of 43,496 participants, 263 were stricken by panic disorder after a mean follow-up period of 3.92 years. With this, the researchers acknowledge that sleep apnea may be a risk factor for panic disorder and recommend physicians to consider the comorbid factor of panic disorder in patients with sleep apnea.

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Oravan Sleep Apnea Device Gains Traction in Sleep Industry

Originally posted in PR Rocket on July 31, 2015

With the advancement of sleep apnea treatment technology, OravanOSA has introduced its FDA cleared Mandibular Advancement Device, aimed to move the jaw forward, further opening the upper airway for easy breathing.

West Orange, NJ (PRWEB) July 31, 2015

With the recent buzz surrounding the dangers of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the growing number of individuals who remain undiagnosed, treatment options for patients are becoming more prevalent than ever before. As millions of Americans continue to shy away from traditional CPAP therapy due to its overall lack of comfort and highly invasive nature, oral appliances provided by dentists are gaining extreme popularity.

Mandibular Advancement Devices (MADs) move the lower jaw forward further opening the upper airway to allow for easy breathing. Of the many MADs on the market today, the Oravan device, manufactured by OravanOSA, has captured the attention of many in the sleep industry.

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Sleep Apnea – Pipeline Review, H2 2014 – Radiant Insights, Inc J

Originally posted in Medgadget on JULY 24TH, 2015 RADIANT INSIGHTS, INC.


Global Markets Direct’s, ‘Sleep Apnea – Pipeline Review, H2 2014′, provides an overview of the Sleep Apnea’s therapeutic pipeline.

This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Sleep Apnea, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases.

It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Sleep Apnea and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects.

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Global Markets Direct’s report features investigational drugs from across globe covering over 20 therapy areas and nearly 3,000 indications. The report is built using data and information sourced from Global Markets Direct’s proprietary databases, Company/University websites, SEC filings, investor presentations and featured press releases from company/university sites and industry-specific third party sources, put together by Global Markets Direct’s team.

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How important is CPAP compliance for individuals afflicted with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)?   

Below is a snippet of a study that was completed to try and predict who was going to become a compliant CPAP user based on information from their sleep study.

Extensive use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has positive clinical benefits for most patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, patient adherence is a major limiting factor to the effectiveness of CPAP treatment. This study determined the potential factors affecting the willingness of patients with OSA to undertake CPAP treatment by comparing the polysomnographic parameters (Sleep Study) recorded during diagnosis (without CPAP) and titration (with CPAP).  A total of 312 patients who were diagnosed with moderate and severe OSA, were divided into persistent users and nonusers of CPAP according to their use of in-home CPAP during a 7-day CPAP trial.  Among the patients, 146 (46.8%) became persistent CPAP users. A 10% improvement of oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and a 10% increment in deep sleep percentage increased the chance of persistent CPAP use.  

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Sound waves can improve sleep and memory, study says



Sound wave therapy can improve sleep and memory, according to a new study fromNorthwestern Medicine in the US.

According to Psych Central, Neuroscience graduate student Nelly Papalambros wanted to find out if there was a non-invasive way to improve sleep quality, because of its many effects on health. Poor sleep has been linked to everything from cognitive problems (including memory issues and difficulty concentrating) to heart attack and disease, while insomnia drastically increases the risk of accident and injury.

Papalambros recruited study participants with an increased risk of heart disease, and measured their baseline stats and sleep patterns while they stayed at a sleep research centre overnight. She then tested whether playing a low-grade static noise could improve their quality of sleep. This sound was developed by Giovanni Santostasi and is personalised in order to be more effective.

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How To Get Better Sleep With A Snorer

About a quarter of people who are married or live with someone say that they’ve lost sleep because of their bed partner, according to a 2005 National Sleep Foundation survey.

And one of the biggest culprits — unsurprisingly — is snoring.

“Today” show viewers sent in video snapshots of what keeps them up at night. And while the results, seen in the clip above, are easy to laugh off, snoring can actually be serious.

Snoring “can be a sign of something more serious, called sleep apnea,” said Eric Cohen, M.D., an obstruction of the airways that can cause a snorer to stop breathing, sometimes hundreds of times a night.

“Your body has to work harder, your heart has to work harder,” Cohen said about sleep apnea, which can lead to health concerns like increased risk of depression, diabetes and heart attack.

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Almost 40% of firefighters suffer from at least one sleep disorder


Sleep problems could be a major factor in explaining why more than 60 percent of firefighter deaths are caused by heart attacks and traffic accidents, a new study published in The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine has found.

Researchers sampled almost 7,000 firefighters across the U.S. and examined how many tested positive for sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia, shift-work disorder and restless leg syndrome, the New York Times reports.

They found that 37 percent of firefighters suffered from at least one type of sleep disorder.

“Our findings demonstrate the impact of common sleep disorders on firefighter health and safety, and their connection to the two leading causes of death among firefighters,” said lead author Laura K. Barger. “Unfortunately, more than 80% of firefighters who screened positive for a common sleep disorder were undiagnosed and untreated.”

Barber’s team found that when compared with those who had a good night’s sleep, firefighters who had a sleep disorder were more likely to crash their car or fall asleep at the wheel.

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How snoring can ruin your day

Picture: Thobeka Zazi Ndabula

QUESTION: I need urgent help. For the past three months I have been constantly exhausted. Most mornings I wake up with great difficulty. I also feel really groggy.

My partner is constantly on my case about me waking her up with my snoring.

She says I stop breathing when I sleep. I feel she is paranoid, but am concerned about my deteriorating function. I feel like a zombie for most of the day now.

ANSWER: The situation sounds very unpleasant. I’m sure it is placing major stress on your relationship. Disturbed sleep is a terrible thing and I do understand your partner’s frustration.

Snoring is often overlooked as a contributor to poor sleep and related health problems. People underestimate the long-term effects, besides losing a relationship partner or the passion in your bedroom.

Another misconception is that only obese people snore. Obesity is often a causative factor, but not always the only culprit.

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ImThera Medical gets US FDA nod for pivotal study for obstructive sleep apnea device

Originally posted in San Diego, California
Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 14:00 Hrs  [IST]

ImThera Medical, a privately held global medical device company, announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has approved an investigational device exemption (IDE) for its THN3 Clinical Study. The THN3 Study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the aura6000 System for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in individuals who are unable to comply or unwilling to try PAP therapy or other OSA treatments. Data from this pivotal clinical study will be used to support a Pre-Market Approval (PMA) application for the aura6000 System.

“This is the most exciting innovation for the treatment of sleep apnea since CPAP,” said Michael Friedman, M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology and director of Chicago Sleep Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL and a study investigator. “I have had experience implanting the device during the earlier THN2 study.

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