All articles in Sleep Apnea

Sound waves can improve sleep and memory, study says

soundwaves-sleep-memory

 Originally posted by DIANE SHIPLEY HEALTH & FITNESS LEAVE A COMMENT

Sound wave therapy can improve sleep and memory, according to a new study fromNorthwestern Medicine in the US.

According to Psych Central, Neuroscience graduate student Nelly Papalambros wanted to find out if there was a non-invasive way to improve sleep quality, because of its many effects on health. Poor sleep has been linked to everything from cognitive problems (including memory issues and difficulty concentrating) to heart attack and disease, while insomnia drastically increases the risk of accident and injury.

Papalambros recruited study participants with an increased risk of heart disease, and measured their baseline stats and sleep patterns while they stayed at a sleep research centre overnight. She then tested whether playing a low-grade static noise could improve their quality of sleep. This sound was developed by Giovanni Santostasi and is personalised in order to be more effective.

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How To Get Better Sleep With A Snorer

About a quarter of people who are married or live with someone say that they’ve lost sleep because of their bed partner, according to a 2005 National Sleep Foundation survey.

And one of the biggest culprits — unsurprisingly — is snoring.

“Today” show viewers sent in video snapshots of what keeps them up at night. And while the results, seen in the clip above, are easy to laugh off, snoring can actually be serious.

Snoring “can be a sign of something more serious, called sleep apnea,” said Eric Cohen, M.D., an obstruction of the airways that can cause a snorer to stop breathing, sometimes hundreds of times a night.

“Your body has to work harder, your heart has to work harder,” Cohen said about sleep apnea, which can lead to health concerns like increased risk of depression, diabetes and heart attack.

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Almost 40% of firefighters suffer from at least one sleep disorder

Firefighter

Sleep problems could be a major factor in explaining why more than 60 percent of firefighter deaths are caused by heart attacks and traffic accidents, a new study published in The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine has found.

Researchers sampled almost 7,000 firefighters across the U.S. and examined how many tested positive for sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia, shift-work disorder and restless leg syndrome, the New York Times reports.

They found that 37 percent of firefighters suffered from at least one type of sleep disorder.

“Our findings demonstrate the impact of common sleep disorders on firefighter health and safety, and their connection to the two leading causes of death among firefighters,” said lead author Laura K. Barger. “Unfortunately, more than 80% of firefighters who screened positive for a common sleep disorder were undiagnosed and untreated.”

Barber’s team found that when compared with those who had a good night’s sleep, firefighters who had a sleep disorder were more likely to crash their car or fall asleep at the wheel.

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How snoring can ruin your day

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Picture: Thobeka Zazi Ndabula

QUESTION: I need urgent help. For the past three months I have been constantly exhausted. Most mornings I wake up with great difficulty. I also feel really groggy.

My partner is constantly on my case about me waking her up with my snoring.

She says I stop breathing when I sleep. I feel she is paranoid, but am concerned about my deteriorating function. I feel like a zombie for most of the day now.

ANSWER: The situation sounds very unpleasant. I’m sure it is placing major stress on your relationship. Disturbed sleep is a terrible thing and I do understand your partner’s frustration.

Snoring is often overlooked as a contributor to poor sleep and related health problems. People underestimate the long-term effects, besides losing a relationship partner or the passion in your bedroom.

Another misconception is that only obese people snore. Obesity is often a causative factor, but not always the only culprit.

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ImThera Medical gets US FDA nod for pivotal study for obstructive sleep apnea device

Originally posted in PHARMABIZ.com San Diego, California
Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 14:00 Hrs  [IST]

ImThera Medical, a privately held global medical device company, announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has approved an investigational device exemption (IDE) for its THN3 Clinical Study. The THN3 Study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the aura6000 System for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in individuals who are unable to comply or unwilling to try PAP therapy or other OSA treatments. Data from this pivotal clinical study will be used to support a Pre-Market Approval (PMA) application for the aura6000 System.

“This is the most exciting innovation for the treatment of sleep apnea since CPAP,” said Michael Friedman, M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology and director of Chicago Sleep Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL and a study investigator. “I have had experience implanting the device during the earlier THN2 study.

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Got Insomnia? Eight Tips to Help You Get the Sleep You Need

Cartoon of man counting sheep

100, 99, 98, 97 … 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 … and let’s start counting those sheep all over again.

Do you have trouble falling or staying asleep? You’re not alone. Most of us have experienced occasional insomnia but for some people, lack of sleep is a chronic issue.

Every once in a while probably won’t cause any problems, but when it’s a nightly occurence, insomnia can lead to a number of physical and mental health issues.

What can happen if you have chronic insomnia

  • Increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes
  • Depression and/or anxiety
  • Lower performance on the job or at school
  • Slowed reaction time while driving and higher risk of accidents
  • Weight gain
  • Irritability
  • Substance abuse
  • Weakened immune system
  • Memory impairment

What the brain does when you’re sleeping

Exactly what happens during sleep that is so important to our brain function is still a scientific mystery.

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Snoring masks don’t kill sex life: Study

A common therapy to tackle obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) does not become a hindrance between the sheets, says a study, allaying fears of OSA patients who believe the therapy interferes with sex.

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is somewhat common in patients with OSA who are often recommended to use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask to get rid of the ED symptoms.

The machine uses a constant flow of positive air pressure to ensure the wearer gets adequate oxygen.

“However, some patients may feel that the PAP interferes with foreplay and sex,” the study said.

For their research, the team from Rosalind Franklin University in Chicago analysed 52 participants who were screened about their sex life, compliance of PAP use, body mass index (BMI), presence of ED and use of drugs like Viagra.

Results showed that when adjusting for all confounding variables, CPAP compliance does not predict sexual quality of life.

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New Study Suggests Untreated Sleep Apnea Can Lead to Diabetes and Hypertension in Hispanics

Hispanics in the U.S. at risk for cardiovascular disease also have a high prevalence of sleep apnea, which is often undiagnosed, suggesting the untreated sleep disorder can lead to diabetes and hypertension in this population, according to an analysis of the results of the landmark Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (SOL).

Alberto R. Ramos, M.D., M.S.P.H., assistant professor of clinical neurology and co-director of the Sleep Medicine Program at Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital and Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, co-authored the report that examined the prevalence of sleep apnea and its relation to high blood pressure and diabetes among 14,440 middle-aged Hispanic men and women from 2008 to 2012. Participants for SOL were recruited from four field centers across the country in Miami, San Diego, Chicago and the Bronx.

The study, “Sleep Disordered Breathing in Hispanic/Latino Individuals of Diverse Backgrounds: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos,” was published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Insomniacs Failing Drugs Suffer from Sleep Apnea

Researchers at the Sleep and Human Health Institute and Maimonides Sleep Arts & Sciences, Ltd investigated drug failure in 1210 chronic insomnia patients and found 91% of those who completed sleep studies actually suffered from previously undiagnosed sleep apnea, a critical factor likely to be aggravating their insomnia.

Albuquerque, N.M., /2014 — Millions of people suffer from chronic insomnia. Complaining of stress, racing thoughts, and other relevant nighttime symptoms, these individuals feel incapable of sleeping all through the night. As their frustrations mount, they try drugstore or online over-the counter (OTC) remedies and many consult physicians who prescribe even stronger medications. Yet, most of these sleep aids fail to alleviate insomnia symptoms, leaving them Sleepless in “Fill-in the City.” The Sleep and Human Health Institute conducted research identifying the cause of drug failure in chronic insomniacs and found overwhelming evidence indicating that most treatment-seeking insomnia patients suffer from unrecognized sleep apnea.

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UPMC offers brand new sleep apnea treatment

 Posted: 10:29 a.m. Monday, June 16, 2014

PITTSBURGH —

About 12 million people are missing out on a good night’s sleep every day.  Sleep apnea can leave patients tired and out of options.  But now, there’s a brand new treatment that’s making history at UPMC.

Channel 11′s Katherine Amenta has an exclusive look at this game-changer.

“You wake up with a headache, every morning,” said Denise Hoover.

Hoover has started every day in pain for the past 20 years.  Sleep apnea has been robbing her of a deep sleep.

“Your tongue basically blocks your airway and you stop breathing,” said Hoover.  “You wake up gasping.”

It’s so bad, Denise hasn’t even had a dream in two decades.  Instead, she’s awake and sometimes wrestling with a CPAP mask.

She finally went to see Dr. Ryan Soose at UPMC Mercy.  He had a brand new solution that could end up making medical history.

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