DGSM Jahrestagung “Schlaf und Psyche” Event

This article will share a curriculum of the latest conference focused on sleep and mental health.
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Last updatedLast updated: April 16, 2022
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When and Where

The Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin (DGSM) conference is the 29th annual conference of the German Society for Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine. This conference will be held virtually from the 28th to the 30th of October, 2021.

Language

According to the program, the official language of the conference is German, but there will be a select few lectures that will be given in English. These have been specially marked in the program.

Program

In addition to the standard conference, the DGSM has also compiled a Sleep Medicine Curriculum E-Learning Course to accompany the typical conference programming. According to their website, the aim of this is to meet the growing demand for more training resources in the sleep medicine space. The curriculum is intended to be a precursor for those who wish to seek a DGSM Somnology Certificate or brush up on their existing sleep medicine knowledge.

The course curriculum contains two types of content: theoretical and clinical-practical. There are five courses available for registration, and the registration fee for each is 175 Euros. Each of the courses is comprised of 10 45-minute units, and those who register will have a full calendar year to complete the course training. The courses are broken down as follows:

Course 1: The Basics of Sleep Medicine

  • Phylogeny and ontogeny of sleep
  • Models of sleep regulation including neural control and chronobiology
  • Physiology of sleep
  • Psychology of sleep
  • Dreams
  • Endocrinology and immunology
  • Methodological basics of sleep diagnostics
  • Epidemiology of specific sleep disorders and sleep medicine diseases in internal medicine, neurology, and psychiatry

Course 2: Insomnia and Circadian Rhythm Disturbances

  • Epidemiology, definition and clinical picture of insomnia
  • Basics of diagnostics
  • Insomniac sleep disorders (primary insomnias, secondary insomnias)
  • Insomnia and mental illness (depression, anxiety, psychosis, obsessive-compulsive disorder, PTSD)
  • Pharmacology of insomnia Trusted Source Prescription pills don't mean better sleep in the long run for women, study suggests - CNN The study’s research on more than 600 women ages 42 to 52 in the United States found that those who used medication to help their insomnia over a one- to two-year period did not get a better night’s sleep than those who did not take any prescription sleeping pills. www.cnn.com
  • Non-drug therapy of insomnia (basics, practice)
  • Circadian sleep-wake rhythm disorders

Course 3: Central Hypersomnias, Movement Disorders During Sleep, Parasomnias

  • Introduction and epidemiology
    • Central hypersomnia: narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, recurrent hypersomnia (Kleine Levin Syndrome)
  • Differential diagnosis of daytime sleepiness
  • Sleep-related movement disorders (RLS, PLMD)
  • Other movement disorders during sleep (bruximus, jactatio, etc.)
  • Parasomnias
  • Seizures while sleeping
  • Sleep disorders in neurological diseases

Course 4: Sleep-Exogenous Respiratory Disorders

  • Introduction and epidemiology
  • Obstructive sleep apnea Trusted Source Treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea - Harvard Health Treatments for obstructive sleep apnea include continuous positive airway pressure, weight loss, disposable nasal valves, surgery, dental appliances, and an implanted nerve stimulator. www.health.harvard.edu syndrome
  • Therapy (conservative measures, nocturnal overpressure therapy)
  • Lower jaw advancing splints
  • Operative procedures

Course 5: Pediatrics

  • Childhood sleep medicine: introduction and overview
  • Special features of infant and child sleep
  • Derivation-related features in the pediatric sleep laboratory
  • Sudden infant death
  • Sleep-related breathing disorders in childhood
  • Chronic insomnia in children
  • Parasomnias (pavor, somnambulism, and nightmares)
  • Narcolepsy in childhood
  • Sleep-wake rhythm disorders in children and adolescents

References

1.
Prescription pills don't mean better sleep in the long run for women, study suggests - CNN
The study’s research on more than 600 women ages 42 to 52 in the United States found that those who used medication to help their insomnia over a one- to two-year period did not get a better night’s sleep than those who did not take any prescription sleeping pills.
2.
Treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea - Harvard Health
Treatments for obstructive sleep apnea include continuous positive airway pressure, weight loss, disposable nasal valves, surgery, dental appliances, and an implanted nerve stimulator.
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