Sleep Problems May Negatively Affect Children’s Reading Ability, Study Suggests

Research has proven that children with sleep problems often face learning difficulties.
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Last updatedLast updated: June 11, 2022
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According to the CDC Trusted Source CDC - How Much Sleep Do I Need? - Sleep and Sleep Disorders How much sleep you need changes as you age. www.cdc.gov , children between 6 and 12 years should get around 9 to 12 hours of sleep every night. Younger children should get no less than 10 hours of sleep, while adults should sleep for at least 7 hours each night.

The British Journal of Educational Psychology recently published new research showing that a child’s learning ability is highly influenced by their sleep patterns. Children that have sleeping problems often face learning difficulties.

This study had a sample pool of 339 children, all between the age of 4 and 14 years. Their parents had to fill out a questionnaire about their children’s sleeping habits while the children took a reading efficiency test. It was revealed that children who performed poorly in both word and nonword reading tasks fell asleep within a short time, showed signs of daytime sleepiness, and had breathing disorders at night, as shown by their parents’ responses.

One of the corresponding authors, Anna Joyce, highlighted that children with sleeping and learning difficulties would have an improved life outcome if they were screened early enough.

References

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CDC - How Much Sleep Do I Need? - Sleep and Sleep Disorders
How much sleep you need changes as you age.
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