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Babies Sleeping with Their Butt in The Air: 5 Different Reasons

Taking care of an infant is not an easy task, and this article puts the minds of parents and caretakers at ease when checking up on sleeping babies.
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Last updatedLast updated: September 27, 2021
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Bringing a bundle of joy home is a wonderfully stressful experience. Babies can be confusing but adorable enigmas. There are many things that infants do that are confusing to adults. However, the things they do are for a reason. Nearly everything an infant does is explore the world around them and figuring out how to interact with their environment.

One of those things is their sleeping positions. The frog position or when a baby sleeps with their butt up in the air is one example. Although it’s adorable, that’s not the only reason why does babies sleep on their knees or why do babies sleep with their butt in the air.

Why do babies sleep with their butt in the air?

Babies Sleeping with Their Butt in The Air: 5 Different Reasons

Most pediatricians concede that when babies are placed on their stomachs, they tend to sleep better.

Adequate sleep is essential for a baby’s development from their brains to the tips of their toes. The sleep cycle of a baby is much different than that of their parents or that of any adult for that matter. The timing, depth, and positioning of their sleep are different. With crib and bassinet mattresses, there are lots of options and elements to keep in mind.

Many babies sleep on their knees with their butt up in the air. This is also known as the frog position. There are many reasons that a baby may do this as well as some things to keep an eye out for as a caregiver. According to the majority of reviews, the best sleep for the baby comes from the Little Sleepy Head Mattress Topper. This product provides great comfort, is Certipur certified, and is compliant with USA safety regulations to give the best sleep possible.

It’s more comfortable

Just like everyone else, babies have their own favorite sleeping positions. Sleeping with their butts in the air is simply more comfortable. Often, babies will roll onto their stomachs from the back just because the position helps them to stay sleeping comfortably.

As the child’s pose in yoga, this position helps relieve any stress and tension that they have collected throughout the day. It’s also a great position to help them pass gas

It allows more freedom in movements

As babies gain freedom in their movements, they always want to be moving.

Babies Sleeping with Their Butt in The Air: 5 Different Reasons

Babies need to move more, as this is vital for their health while growing up.

For example, the moment a baby learns to crawl, there is no stopping their exploration. This is the same for the frog sleeping position. With their butt in the air, the baby can move easier in their sleep and when they first awaken.

It feels like being cuddled

This position feels like being held and cuddled. Baby sleeping on knees creates a comfortable position in which they feel comforted by contact.

Supplying a comfortable environment for an infant is hard when there are so many options for mattresses and accessories. Crib Sheets and Mattress Toppers are two accessories that often get overlooked.

It reminds them of the womb

Children miss the comfort and safety of the womb. This position is like the position they were in within their mother’s womb.

Much like when cats sleep with their paws underneath them, this position works to keep heat in. This ensures the babies are warm while they sleep. Combined with the comfortable position and womb reminder, it makes a relaxing and safe feeling. That’s perfect for getting the little one to sleep.

It builds strength and dexterity

Infants are in a stage of growth and learning. Laying on their stomach and knees, typically known as “tummy time”, encourages babies to work on their coordination, strength, and dexterity.

Is it safe for babies to sleep in this position?

There’s a fine balance between worrying about infants and letting their development run its course as parents.

In short, it IS safe for babies to sleep on their knees with their butt up in the air. This position is a safe and comfortable position for infants after their first birthday.

On that hand, there is a potential danger to the infant depending on varied factors. The most important one is their age and development. In the end, it’s all about making sure the babies are safe, sound, and comfortable while they sleep.

Possible danger

There is a possible danger for young babies, though. The possible danger of this position is the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The CDC describes SIDS Trusted Source About SIDS and SUID | CDC Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) often happen during sleep or in the baby’s sleep area. www.cdc.gov as, “Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) is a term used to describe the sudden and unexpected death of a baby less than 1-year-old in which the cause was not obvious before investigation. These deaths often happen during sleep or in the baby’s sleep area.” This is because they can roll over or shift in such a way that they aren’t able to breathe and thus suffocate.

The Mayo Clinic explains that the items in the crib with the baby as well as their sleeping position combine Trusted Source Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) - Symptoms and causes | Mayo Clinic Although the cause is unknown, it appears that SIDS might be associated with defects in the portion of an infant’s brain that controls breathing and arousal from sleep. www.mayoclinic.org to increase the risk of SIDS. Ensuring the crib is set up with the best possible elements, but the fewest elements help limit the risk. Users recommend Newton Baby Crib Mattress, one of the industry’s leading infant mattresses, as it can limit the suffocation risk and is 100% Washable, Hypoallergenic, and Non-Toxic.

Good sides

The best position for babies to sleep in, in terms of safety is their back. To be on the safe side, it’s better to place the baby on its back to start the night.

Healthy Children Explains Trusted Source How to Keep Your Sleeping Baby Safe: AAP Policy Explained | HealthyChildren.org The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) explains new evidence that supports skin-to-skin care for newborn infants; addresses the use of bedside and in-bed sleepers; and adds to recommendations on how to create a safe sleeping environment. www.healthychildren.org that “Until their first birthday, babies should sleep on their backs for all sleep times—for naps and at night. We know babies who sleep on their backs are much less likely to die of SIDS than babies who sleep on their stomachs or sides.”

However, this is more of a risk for very young infants. As babies grow older, their coordination and motor skills develop, making it simple for them to move their sleeping positions for safety and comfort. If the baby rolls over from their back to their stomach, it’s a good sign that they are strong enough to be able to roll over if they need to.

When to contact a pediatrician?

If there are any questions or concerns, a doctor is a simple phone call away. There are several resources online to ensure the best possible sleep for an infant.

“These deaths are still happening – and they happen to well-meaning parents,” said Dr. Rachel Moon in an interview with CNN Trusted Source Soft bedding continues to claim infant lives despite warnings | CNN Amanda Saucedo did everything the natural parenting blogs she read told her to do before she brought her newborn son Ben into her bed to co-sleep in October 2014. www.cnn.com . She chairs the American Academy of Pediatrics task force on SIDS and authored the AAP policy statement on safe infant sleep Trusted Source SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment | American Academy of Pediatrics Approximately 3500 infants die annually in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, including sudden infant death syndrome. pediatrics.aappublications.org .

“We have remained at the same rate of sleep-related deaths since around 1998,” Dr. Moon added. “And the rate in the US is much higher than that in most developed – and even some not-so-developed countries.”

Final Thoughts

Parents are used to watching their young kids do weird yet adorable things such as looking through their legs, popping everything in their mouth, and of course, sleeping with their butt in the air. These all happen for a reason, whether it’s for comfort or exploring. Specifically, there are many reasons why babies sleep with their butt in the air due to comfort, security, warmth, development, and freedom.

Babies are bundles of joy that require sleep to function and develop. During late-night checks, seeing a baby sleeping on their knees with their butt in the air is not an immediate cause for alarm.

References

1.
About SIDS and SUID | CDC
Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) often happen during sleep or in the baby’s sleep area.
2.
Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) - Symptoms and causes | Mayo Clinic
Although the cause is unknown, it appears that SIDS might be associated with defects in the portion of an infant’s brain that controls breathing and arousal from sleep.
3.
How to Keep Your Sleeping Baby Safe: AAP Policy Explained | HealthyChildren.org
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) explains new evidence that supports skin-to-skin care for newborn infants; addresses the use of bedside and in-bed sleepers; and adds to recommendations on how to create a safe sleeping environment.
4.
Soft bedding continues to claim infant lives despite warnings | CNN
Amanda Saucedo did everything the natural parenting blogs she read told her to do before she brought her newborn son Ben into her bed to co-sleep in October 2014.
5.
SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment | American Academy of Pediatrics
Approximately 3500 infants die annually in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, including sudden infant death syndrome.
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